Jolt Gum

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Jolt Gum Adopt a US unit for Jan 2015 - USS Frank Cable STS Funk from the USS Frank Cable wrote and we selected his team for the Jolt Gum adopt a unit program.   The Frank Cable's sole job is to fix submarines  - fast and...

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Jolt Gum congratulates the Red Sox!   Chew your way to your own championship!   The Red Sox bounced back from a 2012 season they'd rather forget by turning their won-loss record virtually...

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Be more creative. Add noise. Go Goldilocks on noise.  Get it just right and be more creative. It doesn't go to 11, but that noise does give me an idea.... In our never-ending (but occasionally...

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10,000 days of Jolt Cola Jolt Cola was the 1st energy drink sold pretty much anywhere.     Well, there was this also guy named Chaleo who started an energy drink in Thailand in the 1970's,...

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Jolt Energy Gum actually makes you smarter Caffeine all by itself increases alertness, focus, mental speed, and helps improve memory.  Chewing gum all by itself  increases alertness, focus, and most kinds of memory....

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Have a Headache? Your aspirin works double time with caffeine

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Hit the town a little too hard last night and now if feels as if the town’s hitting back inside your head?  Run a half-marathon and now your back hurts so much you think you must have been half-crazy to do it?  Aspirin, Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen and paracetamol are all good choices.

The dream team - aspirin and caffeine. Caffeine makes painkillers more effective.

The dream team – aspirin and caffeine

If you want to play medical MacGyver, just add a little caffeine and you’ll supercharge your pain killer without any additional medicine.  That’s the reason some medicines like Excedrin add caffeine to the pill itself – Excedrin typically has 65mg of caffeine per pill.

Simply, manufacturers add caffeine to their pills to make them work better.  A study in “The Journal of the AMA”  (American Medical Association) compared 30 studies of that took place over a 20 years. One of the findings was that adding caffeine to products like Tylenol (acetaminophen) boosted its performance by 20 to 30 percent.

In 2000, researchers from the Diamond Headache Clinic in Chicago analyzed the effectiveness of caffeine combined with Advil (ibuprofen). Volunteers were given ibuprofen alone, ibuprofen with caffeine,  caffeine alone or a placebo. Caffeine & ibuprofen together provided better pain relief.

Do you need a lot of caffeine?  Not really.  Scientists from Johns Hopkins compared the effect of a placebo, 50, 100 and 150 mg doses of ibuprofen alone or combined with caffeine. The most significant were from the combo of even low dose of caffeine and ibuprofen, up to 2.4 times as powerful as taking ibuprofen by itself.

Posted on : 29-01-2013 | By : morebetter | In : Caffeine, Caffeine and Health, Science of caffeine

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Jolt Energy Gum actually makes you smarter

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Caffeine all by itself increases alertness, focus, mental speed, and helps improve memory.  Chewing gum all by itself  increases alertness, focus, and most kinds of memory.  Put them together and… well, you do the math. Scientists know that the 1 + 1 is at least two, but they’re not sure exactly why.  Knowing why may not be as important to you as knowing caffeine gum can help you score higher on exams.

Let’s start with chewing gum.  Any flavored chewing gum will do.  There are numerous studies that show chewing gum, especially a flavored gum, will help improve alertness and memory, in some cases by as much as 24%.

hippocampus

The Hippocampus is a key area for memory

There are a few potential explanations for gum’s benefit, says Dr. Andrew Scholey, author of several studies and director of the Center for Human Psychopharmacology at Swinburne University, Melbourne.  In 2000, researchers showed that brain activity in the hippocampus, an area important for memory, increases while people chew.

Other research suggests that insulin receptors in the hippocampus may be involved in memory. “Insulin mops up glucose in the bloodstream and chewing causes the release of insulin, because the body is expecting food. If insulin receptors in the brain are involved in memory, we may have an insulin-mediated mechanism explaining our findings.”

Alternately, it could be as simple as increased alertness and/or increased blood flow to the brain from and increased heart beat.

But what if we could improve upon chewing gum?  What if there was a magic ingredient we could add to gum that would help your brain even more?  What if we didn’t keep writing “what if’s” when you already know where we’re going with this?

Caffeine, as we’d all expect,  increases alertness, but together with a little glucose, has a significant effect on memory.  Caffeine also improves cognition and mental speed, so basically, caffeine just helps you think better and faster.    Put the caffeine inside the gum as they do with a caffeinated gum like Jolt Energy Gum, and you’ve got a little magic mastication!

A totally different Hippocampus

The Hippo Campus is also a place where Hippos go to college

The only time where you might want to go for the Starbucks and not the double-word-score caffeine gum combo, is if you’re taking a test involving a type of short-term memory called serial recall – recalling items or events in the order in which they occurred.  Any rhythmic activity such as chewing gum or tapping with your hands has been shown to decrease test results in this area.

In summary,  if you have to memorize a long list in order, brew up a pot of coffee or chug a Jolt Cola.    If you want to improve performance on pretty much any other kinds of exam or mental exercise, reach for a pack of Jolt Energy Gum.  Now chewing Jolt caffeine-energy gum isn’t just smart, Jolt Energy gum actually makes you smarter.

Not only will you stay alert, but you’ll remember why you’re doing so.

 

 

Posted on : 29-01-2013 | By : morebetter | In : Caffeine, Caffeine gum, Science of caffeine

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Wait….Caffeine ISN’T a Diuretic?

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Everyone knows caffeine is a diuretic, right?

Don’t be so fast to flush that toilet… turns out that conventional wisdom is wrong.  The latest science that… ummm… people who actually research the topic shows that consuming a caffeinated beverage has no more of a diuretic effect than… wait for it… water.  As far back in 1928, caffeine was found to have no significant impact on output of urine. Later studies corroborated this, finding caffeinated beverages did not affect total volume or flow any differently than other beverages.

The Institute of Medicine found that “caffeinated beverages appear to contribute to the daily total water intake similar to that contributed by non-caffeinated beverages.”

Caffeine actually doesn't make you visit the bathroom more frequently

Does this image of a waterfall make you want to pee? Maybe. But does a caffeinated beverage? Not so much.

So did the conventional wisdom become conventional? i.e.  how did the wive’s tale get started?  Basically, it seems the belief that caffeinated beverages increases your total urine output stems from research solely among people who don’t use caffeine.  And indeed, if you are a caffeine virgin, i.e. you don’t consume caffeine,  the old rules apply.  Caffeine is a mild diuretic for those people who haven’t used it in a while.

On the other hand, if you’re similar to the significant majority of actual people who consume caffeine, then according to a bunch of studies and articles about studies, caffeine actually doesn’t increase the number of times you need to visit the loo.

 

 

Posted on : 22-01-2013 | By : morebetter | In : Athletic Performance and caffeine, Caffeine, Science of caffeine

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